Cancer Research News

The latest cancer news from the U.S. government's principal agency for cancer research.
  1. Monica M. Bertagnolli, M.D., begins her tenure as the 16th director of the National Cancer Institute on October 3, 2022. She previously served as the Richard E. Wilson Professor of Surgery in the field of surgical oncology at Harvard Medical School, a surgeon at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and a member of the Gastrointestinal Cancer Treatment and Sarcoma Centers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.
  2. A new study finds that former smokers who stick to a healthy lifestyle have a lower risk of dying from all causes, including cancer and heart and lung disease, than those who don’t have healthy habits.
  3. A prospective study of half a million tea drinkers in the U.K. suggests potential mortality benefits of drinking black tea may be associated with a lower risk of death.
  4. A study found equivalent amounts of 7 different activities were associated with a lower risk of death from any cause, cardiovascular disease, and cancer.
  5. NCI awards $23 million to academic institutions to establish centers of excellence to conduct research on the role of telehealth in delivering cancer care.
  6. In patients with certain variations in the OAS1 gene, treatment for severe COVID-19 with interferons, a type of protein that can help the body’s immune system fight infections, decreased the viral load of SARS-CoV-2, a new study found.
  7. COVID-19 was the third leading cause of death in the United States between March 2020 and October 2021, according to an analysis of national death certificate data by researchers at the National Cancer Institute.
  8. The Cancer Grand Challenges Program will award $100 million to four interdisciplinary teams from around the world to solve some of the toughest challenges in cancer research. Each team will receive $25 million over 5 years.
  9. Results from the NCI-supported ANCHOR study show that treating anal precancerous growths known as high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions, or HSIL, reduces the chance that anal cancer will develop by more than half.
  10. From 1999—2019, US rates of cancer death fell among Black people. Yet, in 2019, their rates remained higher than those of other racial and ethnic groups.